Berklee Blogs

First-hand accounts of the Berklee experience

Tag: production (Page 2 of 5)

production

Marco Angelone: Final Days

Berklee Blogs follows Marco Angelone, an international student from Milan, Italy as he continues his internship started last summer through Berklee at Notable Productions

Hello Everyone.

Finals are coming pretty fast and everybody is busy. Last week at Notable Productions, I was focusing on editing a song from Africa and I wrote a possible bass line since the original was missing in the pro tools session and we couldn’t find it. This work was actually pretty fun when it came to the writing process and I enjoyed finding a bass line for the song.

I also assisted Chris, Dan’s co-worker, in tuning some vocals in Melodyne for a beautiful project called “Rockstars for Life”. From my understanding, this project is from an organization that helps children and teenagers with terminal disease and cancer record their own songs in a recording studio. And in this particular case I guess Daniel Cantor is going to be the mixing engineer and co-producer.

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Marco Angelone: Video Projects and Tech Support

Berklee Blogs follows Marco Angelone, an international student from Milan, Italy as he continues his internship started last summer through Berklee at Notable Productions

Here at Notable Productions, we are involved in many different kinds of projects and in the past two weeks, among many other things (like mixing, naming cables, storing data) we’ve been working on a live recording for an Opera singer named Suzanne. So Dan and Ryan, another intern, recorded a live performance of hers along with video from two cameras.

Suzanne told us this recording was for an audition at an Opera school she is applying for, which requires a video presentation as part of the audition. Our goal was to mix the audio recording onto the video footage and we decided to use Final cut pro X for this. My task was to import, edit and divide those videos of the performance and mark beginning and end points of songs. Then take on the bigger task of matching the audio to the independent videos that we got from the video cameras.

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Marco Angelone: A Long Day

Berklee Blogs follows Marco Angelone, an international student from Milan, Italy as he continues his internship started last summer through Berklee at Notable Productions

These past 2 weeks were really intense.

Last week at Notable, the time arrived to name all the cables. So last week I started to name quarter inch cables balanced and unbalanced with first names of famous guitar players. On Thursday the 20th, I improvised myself as a photographer because Dan needed to have some photos for gear being sold online. So I prepared the gear, the lights and I took many photos trying to be creative.

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Live From Monterey: For Next Year (part 2)

Sue Buzzard is a violinist and Berklee alumna from the east coast who recently interned with The Monterey Jazz Festival in Monterey, CA.* In the second and final post, Sue evaluates what it was like living and Monterey and how the festival went as a whole.

Living in Monterey

Pros:

  • Complimentary Housing: Many thanks to Jim Costello, Monterey Jazz Fest board member who has contributed his residence in Pacific Grove to the past three interns. Staying there rent-free was an enormous asset.
  • Proximity to the ocean: Gorgeous view for after-work walks

Cons:

  • Distance from housing to office/fairgrounds: Bring a car, or get a ride. You cannot walk or safely bike to the office or the fairgrounds, as it requires crossing the freeway. I carpooled from Pacific grove with both Rob Klevan and Jan Stotzer.
  • Proximity to the ocean: Gorgeous view, but it gets cold since you’re by the bay. I thought all of CA was warm and sunny. That’s just LA. Bring a sweater.

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Live From Monterey: For Next Year (part 1)

Sue Buzzard is a violinist and Berklee alumna from the east coast who recently interned with The Monterey Jazz Festival in Monterey, CA.* In the next two posts, Sue evaluates her internship and what she learned in the process.


I’ve been settling into my new life in Boston the past month and looking ahead at possible projects. I haven’t spent much time thinking about Monterey- only to understand more about what skills it left me with and what I now have a hunger to develop. For my final reflection, I’d like to list my personal pros and cons of interning at Monterey.

The areas I want to look at are:

  • Monterey’s job performance (from working with my Production Manager, Bill Wagner)
  • My own job performance (what I gave Bill and the others)
  • Living experiences (what it was like staying in Monterey)
  • Festival Weekend (How the actual event went)



Monterey’s performance

Pros:

  • Fantastic work environment: Impeccable office, clean and organized, respect and enthusiasm from each member of staff.
  • Freedom to complete tasks: Bill’s tasks were direct and to the point, but he was never a clock watcher over my shoulder. He didn’t have time to be, so he had to trust that I was working efficiently.
  • Trust and insight into the festival’s innerworkings: As an intern I was a member of staff, and attended weekly meetings and updates. No information was ever purposefully withheld from me, and if I inquired about details, responses were informative or politely curtailed. Example: I asked how the gala was organized and run, and what purpose it was for. Both Eva and Paul gave me answers and told me what the event meant for the festival.

Cons:

  • Limited potential for tasks: My stay was only for 5 weeks, essentially the last mile of the marathon of festival prep. There was only so much I could do to help. With a longer internship (all summer?), I could’ve gotten even more experience and contributed more help and ideas.


Sue’s performance

Pros:

  • Enthusiasm: I did my best to put energy into every task, and pump myself up so as to stay focused on getting things done quickly and efficiently.
  • Professionalism: I treated everyone with respect, and asked for help when I needed help on a task. I tried to stay away from “do it all myself,” especially when I knew that I lacked expertise on certain office software required for the job.
  • Proactivity: during the festival I spent as much time as I could backstage. Sue and Timothy Orr, awesomest dude ever.


 Studying how the crew worked and talking to the stage managers about their jobs. I was going to learn from as many people as possible, I decided, and asked everyone for details about what they did. Timothy Orr, who should’ve been mentioned much earlier in this blog, is head of press and gave me great info.

Cons:

  • Lack of Skills: Working in the MJF office meant using Microsoft Office and Excel. If I had better understanding and skill in spreadsheets, and more experience working in an office, I would’ve been able to get tasks done by myself faster, and Bill wouldn’t have had to break down so many jobs for me.
  • Less Communication: I have a fear of being wrong, or of doing the wrong thing. I let that fear get in the way of informing Bill and at times others of problems or uncertainties I was having. I was sure in the things I knew how to do, but when I was unsure, I procrastinated asking for help, trying to learn how to fix the problem myself.


Check out Sue’s next post to see how she evaluates living in Monterey and how the actual festival progressed…

*Reposted with permission from Sue Buzzard

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Read Sue’s Other Posts

The Dust Settles

Four Lessons from Monterey

Delegation Rocks!

Necessary Details?

The Dog Days are Just Beginning

Monterey Jazz Festival Intern

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Bio

Sue Buzzard is a warrior of the acoustic string music revolution. Following her studies in classical and jazz music techniques in her hometown of Buffalo, NY, she studied a plethora of violin sounds at The Berklee College of Music.

Sue graduated with a double degree in Violin Performance and Professional Music in the spring of 2010, and has since been performing and seeking more ways to bring string music to the masses through production and education. Sue is on faculty at The Rivers School Conservatory in Weston starting this fall, where she will teach Jazz Violin.

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